Interactive Histories, Co-Produced Communities: Judaism, Christianity, Islam

Our goal is to provide the foundations of a new history of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as co-produced communities, a history that makes clear the many different ideas and ideals that each of these communities has formed, and continues to form, by interacting with or imagining the others.

Learn more
All Sources

Source in the Spotlight

The Co-Production of Early Islam in the Maronite Chronicle

The Co-Production of Early Islam in the Maronite Chronicle

A short Syriac Christian world chronicle, written around the year 665 AD, takes on new significance as a unique witness to the co-production of earliest Islam. Its details reveal a fascinating transitional period in which Arab caliphs could pray at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher and Mary’s tomb, adjudicate inter-Christian theological disputes, and mint coins with crosses for their majority-Christian subjects. These details have turned the so-called Maronite Chronicle, which would otherwise be deeply obscure, into a priceless resource for historians of earliest Islam, and have even led to its use in online Christian polemics against Islam.

Learn more
All Events

Event: International Conference

Conference: Co-producing Heresies: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

September 1–4, 2024 Schloss Münchenwiler (CH)

Learn more

Event: International Conference

Conference: Co-produced Rituals between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Uncovering a Common Late Antique and Early Medieval Religious Culture

April 2–3, 2025 Bern, Switzerland

Learn more

About

Who we are

The project is coordinated by Katharina Heyden, Professor for Ancient History of Christianity and Interreligious Encounters at the University of Bern (Switzerland), and David Nirenberg, Director and Leon Levy Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (U.S.), and includes a network of collaborators across North America, Europe, and the Middle East.

Learn more

New Case Study

James Baldwin’s Meeting with Elijah Muhammad and the Co-Production of Religion and Black Identities in Twentieth-Century America

In their forthcoming article titled “Co-produced Religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam” (2024), Katharina Heyden and David Nirenberg call for a consideration of how the three religions have shaped and continue to shape racial imaginaries. This case study utilizes James Baldwin’s meeting with Elijah Muhammad as a framing device for discussing some early twentieth-century narratives of Judaism and Islam as reimagined through the prism of black racialized identities.

Read more

Stay informed about our
latest news & events

Subscribe to our mailing list